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Investing in 2019 and Beyond

We are about to embark on a very different era for investing in Australia and across the globe.  As we near the close of 2018 our firm paused to reflect on the year and in doing so, it became clear just how much has happened and the profound effect it is likely to have on our economy moving forward. This isn’t to say that we expect things to be worse or better for the next two to three years, just different.

This year we have witnessed an unprecedented series of events unfold both at home and abroad.  Trade wars, Brexit, the Royal Commission, Korean nuclear threats and to finish it all off; rioting in the streets of France.  With all that has happened, it is no wonder that markets have been a little nervous coming into final months of the year.

Despite the uncertainty, there is one thing we can be absolutely sure of.  The world will not end.  Consumers will continue to consume products, countries will continue to trade, and we will of course be required to pay our taxes.  Unfortunately, the evolution of the local and global economy means that the way we are used to investing isn’t going to produce the same results moving forward.  Let me explain:

  1. Active vs Passive debate to take full swing.

Proponents of passive management have enjoyed fortuitous conditions since as early as 2011.  Despite a little bump in 2015, most global markets including the ASX have enjoyed very steady consistent growth.  The same can be said for the Australian property market.  It didn’t really matter what you were invested in or where, it was very likely that it would be worth more in one year than what you had paid for it.  This gave weight to the passive management argument, “why pay for active management fees when decent returns could be gained through low cost index investing?”

Unfortunately, this theory is already and will continue to be heavily tested.  Property prices in Sydney and Melbourne are already down circa 10% and of the top ten companies on the ASX, which make up 38% of the index, only half recorded a positive 12 months shareholder return.  The same can be said in the U.S where the likes of Apple, Amazon, Facebook and JP Morgan which make up a fair proportion of the index have also given back much of the gains earned during the year.

Interestingly, for most of the companies experiencing share price pressure the cause was well telegraphed.  Most active managers, many of whom had struggled to outperform the index funds (after fees) during the broad-spectrum bull market had lightened their exposure in anticipation of the recent correction.  This is not to say that we expect all active managers to outperform in the coming years, some will perform, some won’t.  I do expect however that as the world continues to evolve and markets are disrupted by changing trends that returns for index funds will likely be underwhelming.

  1. The D.I.Y model could be more stress and work than it is worth

Access to information via the internet has made it possible for many to undertake research and create their own investment portfolios.  Mostly this lead to a concentrated portfolio consisting of the four big banks, Telstra, BHP, RIO and maybe Origin or Santos.  The reason being that it is terribly difficult to effectively monitor any more than 10 investments while trying to juggle work, family or enjoy retirement.

For the period leading up to early this year, that strategy could produce a modest return.  I remember presenting at a conference in early 2017 when someone in the audience asked, “why would I want to pay an active manager a fee when I can just buy the four banks and Telstra and get a 6% dividend yield?”  My answer at the time was that although they are large ‘blue-chip’ companies and seem like a balanced risk, the concentration of the portfolio is significantly adding to that risk by not properly diversifying the investments.  Supporting that answer is the fact that as I write this, the capital value of that portfolio would be down circa 23%.

The key to managing risk is proper diversification but this can be difficult.  Even in an age where information is at our fingertips and plentiful, we need to consider the quality of that information.  Competition for website clicks and digital media subscriptions has forced content producers to choose quantity over quality often behaving like seagulls at the beach, just trying to squawk a little louder than the others in the hope they might end up with a free chip.

Even with company announcements and annual reports, the devil is in the detail.  As we have seen with the likes of AMP, Myer and a few other boards that received protest votes from investors at their annual general meetings, no longer can we simply take the word of management as gospel and each report requires careful analysis and interpretation to ensure that the performance of the business is in accordance with what is being reported by the board.

  1. Sitting on cash still not a viable alternative.

Despite the rhetoric from the FED and RBA, interest rate rises are still some way off.  With inflation still sitting at around 2.5%, and term deposit rates at 2% doing nothing comes at a cost.  Additionally, who wants to lend money to the banks at 2% just so they can lend it back to us at 4%?  The other common practice was to just pay off the family home but given the definite turn in the property price cycle, capital growth of the family home is likely to be flat or negative for the foreseeable future and given that interest rates are still only 4% versus the nearly 8% currently on offer from companies trading at near 5-year lows you could argue that the risk of equities is being adequately rewarded.  There are many alternatives in between also for those who aren’t particularly comfortable with the risk of direct shares like bonds and hybrids which offer a greater return then term deposits.

In conclusion, if ever there was a time to review the investment strategy this is probably it.  With the right advice and the right strategy, there is plenty of opportunity on offer in both property, bonds and shares.

About the Author

steve

 

Steven Everett is a Portfolio Manager for Belvedere Share Managers.  Specialising in emerging sectors particularly technology, Steven is also a guest presenter on Sky News Business.

You can contact Steven on 0438 774 577 or by emailing stevene@belvedereshares.com.au

Steven Everett No Comments

Corrections aren’t to be feared

Corrections such as the markets experienced in October are never nice but they are part and parcel of live markets and have to be accepted and taken advantage of.  When prices are falling, sentiment turns negative and human nature prevents most from buying.  Even for professional investors it is not easy buying when in all likelihood the stock will be down further the next day,  but that it is exactly what we do.  It is pleasing to write this following a big lift in US Markets following their mid- term elections.

When good companies are down 20 plus per cent on general market sentiment then they are on our buy radar.  We know that we will not pick the exact bottom, but we are buying well.  A recent example of this is a company called Reliance Worldwide which created a plumbing product that is revolutionising the plumbing industry.  In very simplistic terms, it invented, patented and now manufactures a ‘push to connect’ product for pipes (called “Sharkbite”), which enables plumbing without the need for welding.  The big advantage – labour hours and costs are reduced dramatically and is applicable to the DIY and professional markets.  Reliance has experienced tremendous growth here in Australia and is now rolling out into the US and recently acquired a large plumbing distribution business in Europe at a fair price.  I am sure this distribution business will be used to escalate the roll-out of Sharkbite.

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Shares pulled back from $6.50 to $5 and we started buying only to watch them briefly hit $4.60.  It was only for a very short time and we expect them to continue rise over time to their previous highs. It is a good example of buying well, albeit not at the bottom.

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Raphael Geminder took over the reigns from Malcolm Bundey in September this year.

Another example of buying a large quality industrial company after a sizable share price pullback is Pact Group, which is a packaging company with operations here and throughout Asia.  Pact’s share price had fallen from $6 to $3.50 after a earnings miss predominantly caused by a rise in the resin costs used in packaging.  These costs are ultimately passed on, however there is a timing issue and we believe the market over reacted in the sell down.  Importantly, Pact chairman and major shareholder is Raphael Geminder of the Pratt Visy dynasty, who knows a thing or two about the packaging industry.

The well publicised practices of the banks and the wobbles in the residential property markets exacerbating the negative sentiment saw the prices of banks fall to a point where the grossed-up dividend yields were approaching circa 9 per cent.  Updates from a number of the banks reaffirmed their dividends, and more importantly to us that their excess capital was better than what the market was anticipating.  The only real risk to their business models is a very serious fall in the property prices across Australia.  On balance, we don’t see a property crash ( over 30% )and they remain some of the strongest banks in the world operating in an oligopoly and offering an oversized yield.

In all likelihood the recent volatility will continue, and regardless of the short-term outcome, markets will always experience corrections. They are part and parcel of investing and are a reminder to stick with defined strategies.

Would you like to talk with us about managing your equities portfolio?  You can contact us here